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Topic

Data Sources

Arts and Culture ACIP
Crime UCR
Demographics ACS, Census, Children of Immigrants, Exurbia, Neighborhood Diversity, Latino Segregation
Economic Output MetroMonitor
Education PLS, Disconnected Youth
Employment ACIP, CES, LAUS, MetroMonitor, OES
Financial Services FDIC, MetroMonitor
Food Insecurity CPS
Health Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Health Insurance ACS Health Insurance Indicators
Housing ACS, Housing Affordability, Census, HMDA, HPI, LPS/LISC, MetroMonitor, Out of Reach, Latino Segregation, Zillow Home Values, Project-based Housing
Nonprofits ACIP
Unemployment LAUS, MetroMonitor
Wages OES, Out of Reach, MetroMonitor


Find data by data source (in alphabetical order):

Arts and Culture Indicators Project (ACIP)

The Urban Institute's Arts and Culture Indicators Project has developed both a comprehensive definition of cultural vitality and tools for how to measure it. Cultural vitality indicators measure the practice of creating, disseminating, validating and supporting arts and culture as a dimension of everyday community life and conditions. The indicators include data on arts employment and the strength of the commercial and nonprofit arts sectors, drawing from Occupational Employment Statistics, Non-Employer Statistics, County Business Patterns, and the National Center for Charitable Statistics.

Commentaries:

Arts and Culture

Source:

http://metrotrends.org/natdata/acip/index.cfm
http://nccs.urban.org/

Download Data:

2006 and 2008

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American Community Survey (ACS)

The American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing statistical survey run by the U.S. Census Bureau, replacing the long form in the decennial census. The ACS has approximately 250,000 respondents monthly, totaling 3 million per year. The dataset describes Americans' demographic makeup, income levels, housing circumstances, and more.

Commentaries:

Urban Seniors, Earnings and Housing Affordability,
New Metropolitan Diversity, Investing in Children, Income Inequality

Source:

http://www.census.gov/acs

Download Data:

2007, 2008, 2009, Income Inequality Indicators, Project-Based Housing

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ACS Health Insurance Indicators

This extract of the ACS provides indicators of the type and level of health insurance held by Americans in 2008. The file for download includes the standard errors associated with the statistical estimates.

Commentaries:

Challenges for Health Reform

Source:

http://www.census.gov/acs

Download Data:

2008

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Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

The BRFSS is a cross-sectional telephone survey conducted by state health departments with technical and methodological assistance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2009, the BRFSS collected data on 432,607 noninstitutionalized adults.

Commentaries:

Chronic Disease in US Metropolitan Areas

Source:

http://www.cdc.gov/Brfss/

Download Data:

BRFSS

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U.S. Census
Every ten years through 2000, the Census Bureau conducted a national household survey.  The federal government uses Decennial Census data for apportioning congressional seats, for identifying distressed areas, and for many other activities.  Census data were collected using two survey forms: the short form and the long form.  Short form information is collected on every person and includes basic characteristics, such as age, sex, and race.  The long form was sent to one out of every six households and collects more detailed information, such as income, housing characteristics, and employment.  (The American Community Survey has since replaced the Long Form data.) Most of the indicators in the summary file are from the long form, and are thus estimates based on the sample of households.  These values may differ considerably from the same indicators based on the Short Form data, particularly for small areas.
Commentaries: Urban Seniors, New Metropolitan Diversity
Source: http://www.census.gov
Download Data: 1990, 2000
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Children of Immigrants IPUMS Calculations (COI)

The Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS-USA) consists of more than fifty high-precision samples of the American population drawn from fifteen federal censuses and from the American Community Surveys of 2000-2009 (Ruggles et al. 2010). IPUMS is not a collection of compiled statistics; it is composed of microdata where each record is a person organized into households, making it possible to study the characteristics of people in the context of their families or other co-residents. The microdata are weighted in order to calculate aggregate statistics for diverse geographies. The Urban Institute used the 2000 U.S. Census of Population and Housing, 5 percent sample and the combined 2008 and 2009 American Community Survey datasets that together comprise a 2 percent sample of the U.S. population. The number of children with immigrant parents is estimated for the smallest level of geography available in the microdata, the Primary Use Microdata Areas (PUMAs). In order to derive metro level statistics, the Urban Institute employed the Missouri Census Data Center's MABLE/Geocorr2K online application to crosswalk the 2000 PUMAs to the U.S. Census Bureau November 2008 Core Based Statistical Area definitions.

"Children of immigrants" or "children with immigrant parents" are children who have at least one foreign-born parent living in the household. Children with native-born parents live with two parents that are both native-born or a single parent who is native-born. "Immigrant" or "foreign-born" persons are born outside the United States and its territories. Those born in Puerto Rico and other territories or born abroad to U.S. citizen parents are "native-born."

Source: Steven Ruggles, J. Trent Alexander, Katie Genadek, Ronald Goeken, Matthew B. Schroeder, and Matthew Sobek. Integrated Public Use Microdata Series: Version 5.0 [Machine-readable database]. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2010

Commentaries:

Children of Immigrants

Source:

http://usa.ipums.org/usa/, http://mcdc.missouri.edu/websas/geocorr2k.html

Download Data:

Children of Immigrants

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Current Employment Statistics (CES)
Each month the Current Employment Statistics (CES) program surveys about 150,000 businesses and government agencies, representing approximately 390,000 individual worksites, in order to provide detailed industry data on employment, hours, and earnings of workers on nonfarm payrolls.
Commentaries: Vanishing Manufacturing Jobs, Employment Recession and Recovery
Source: http://www.bls.gov/ces
Download Data: January 2000 - November 2013, Employment Recession and Recovery
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Current Population Survey (CPS)

The Current Population Survey (CPS) is a monthly survey of about 50,000 households conducted by the Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The CPS is the primary source of information on the labor force characteristics of the U.S. population. The sample is scientifically selected to represent the civilian noninstitutional population. The CPS includes indicators on employment, unemployment, earnings, hours of work, and other indicators. The MetroTrends commentary on Earnings and Housing Affordability used the CPS Food Security Supplement to analyze indicators of food insecurity, which is determined based on a series of 18 questions about experiences and behaviors that indicate food insecurity, such as being unable, at times, to afford balanced meals, cutting the size of meals because of too little money for food, or being hungry because of too little money for food.

NOTE: Because the CPS sample is not designed to be representative of each metropolitan area individually, the MetroTrends CPS file only includes two records: one for the US as a whole, and one for all metropolitan areas combined.

Commentaries: Earnings and Housing Affordability
Source: http://www.census.gov/cps
Download Data: 2005 - 2008
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Disconnected Youth - US Census Bureau

These data are a custom tabulation of 2005-2009 US Census Bureau ACS data, with indicators measuring the number of "disconnected" youth in the nation's 20 largest metropolitan statistical areas. Disconnected youth are those both unemployed and not enrolled in school. The data include cuts by race, education level and unemployment.

Commentaries: Disconnected Youth
Source: http://www.census.gov
Download Data: Disconnected Youth
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Exurbia - US Census Bureau

These data are a custom tabulation of 2000 US Census Bureau data, used to define and calculate relative urban and exurban populations in the top 100 metropolitan areas. Criteria used to define exurban areas include housing density (number of units per square mile), age of housing stock, and commuting ties to neighboring metropolitan centers. In general, exurban areas have low housing density, newer housing stock and at least 25% of residents who commute to an urban core.

Commentaries: Exurbia in 2000
Source: http://www.census.gov
Download Data: Exurbia in 2000, Exurbia in 2007
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FDIC Survey of Unbanked and Underbanked US Households

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) conducted the 2009 FDIC National Survey of Unbanked and Underbanked Households to address a gap in reliable data on the number of unbanked and underbanked households in the United States, and as part of its efforts to comply with a statutory mandate that requires the FDIC to conduct ongoing surveys of banks on their efforts to serve the unbanked. The household survey complements the FDIC Survey on Banks' Efforts to Serve the Unbanked and Underbanked, published in February 2009, and provides significant new insights into the size of the unbanked and underbanked markets at the national, state, and large metropolitan statistical area (MSA) level. It is intended to inform policymakers and the industry about economic inclusion issues, and to promote the goal of ensuring that all Americans have access to basic, safe, and affordable bank services.

Commentaries:

Alternative Financial Services

Source:

FDIC Survey

Download Data:

2009 Survey

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Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA)
The Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) requires most lending institutions to report mortgage loan applications, including the outcome of the application, information about the loan and applicant, and location of the property. In 2004, FFIEC expanded the data to include structure type, lien status, and if the loan had high interest rates. FFIEC collects the data in order to determine whether financial institutions are meeting a community's housing credit needs; to target community development funds to attract private investment; and to identify possible discriminatory lending patterns. The reporting requirements are based on the level of institutional assets and the number of loans originated in metro areas. The loan-level data are summarized for various geographic levels into indicators on the racial and income distribution of borrowers, denial rates by race and income, and loans from subprime lenders by race.
Commentaries: Muddling the Mortgage Market
Source: http://www.ffiec.gov/hmda
Download Data: 1997 - 2010
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Housing Affordability
The MetroTrends team has graded the nation's 100 biggest metros based on how the cost of housing (median rents and house prices) compares to median family incomes. We calculate "rent burden" by dividing median gross rent by median family income. Similarly, "new home owner burden" is the metro's median home value divided by its median family income. The size of the mortgage is 100 pecent of the median home value and the terms are for efixed monthly payments over 30 years at 4 percent annual interest rate. The data come from ACS 2010 one-year survey.
Commentaries: Ranking Metros' Housing Affordability
Source: U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey
Download Data: Housing Affordability - Rank
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House Price Index (HPI)

The HPI is a broad measure of the movement of single-family house prices.  The HPI is a weighted, repeat-sales index, meaning that it measures average price changes in repeat sales or refinancings on the same properties. This information is obtained by reviewing repeat mortgage transactions on single-family properties whose mortgages have been purchased or securitized by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac since January 1975.

NOTE: The HPI source data do not provide HPI values for metropolitan areas that contain metropolitan divisions, instead just providing the values for the divisions. MetroTrends estimates the HPI for these metros by calculating the geometric mean of the HPI across the metro divisions within each metro. To aggregate metro-level HPI values across all (or the top 100) metros, MetroTrends uses a simple arithmetic mean across the metros.

Commentaries: Double Trouble, Earnings and Housing AffordabilityDouble Trouble Revisited 
Source: http://www.fhfa.gov/Default.aspx?Page=87
Download Data: Q1 2000 - Q3 2013
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HUD "A Picture of Subsidized Households" Database

Picture of Subsidized Households describes the nearly 5 million households living in HUD-subsidized housing in the United States for the year 2008. Picture 2008 provides characteristics of assisted housing units and residents, summarized at the national, state, public housing agency (PHA), project,census tract, county, Core-Based Statistical Area and city levels.

Commentaries: Project-based Housing
Source: A Picture of Subsidized Households - 2008
Download Data: Project-based Housing
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Latino Segregation
These data describing the state of Latino populations, segregation and home ownership in Metropolitan America are an amalgamation of data from US Census, ACS 2005-2009, and Brown University's US2010 data project.
Commentaries: Latino Segregation
Source: http://www.census.gov
Download Data: 2005-2009
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Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS)
The Bureau of Labor Statistics LAUS program produces monthly and annual employment, unemployment, and labor force data for the regions, states, counties, metropolitan areas, and select cities of the United States. State estimates (including those for the District of Columbia) are based on the Current Population Survey, while indicators for substate areas are based on data from several sources, including the Current Population Survey, the Current Employment Statistics program, and the Unemployment Insurance program.
Commentaries: Double Trouble, Earnings and Housing Affordability, Vanishing Manufacturing Jobs, New Metropolitan Diversity, Double Trouble Revisited
Source: http://www.bls.gov/lau
Download Data: January 1990 - November 2013
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Analysis of LPS Applied Analytics data by Local Initiatives Support Corporation, tabulated by the Urban Institute
LPS Applied Analytics provides loan-level home mortgage data representing approximately two-thirds of the U.S. home mortgage universe. These data comprise over 40 million loans and span the credit and grade spectrum. This extract derives from an Urban Institute tabulation of the quarterly analysis and update process of LPS data by the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC).
Commentaries: Mortgages at Risk (6/2010), Sunbelt Delinquency Rates Still High (12/2010), Serious Delinquency Rates (3/2011)
Source: http://www.foreclosure-response.org/maps_and_data/metro_delinquency_data_tables.html
Download Data: June 2010, December 2010, March 2011
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MetroMonitor
The Brookings Institution's quarterly MetroMonitor report measures economic performance and recovery in the top 100 largest metropolitan areas. The report focuses on indicators of economic output, employment and wages, and the housing market, using data from sources such as Moody's Analytics, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Federal Housing Finance Administration, and LPS Applied Analytics/McDash.
Commentaries: Economic Recovery (2010 Q3), Economic Output (2010 Q4), Recession (2011 Q1)Job Loss (2011 Q2), Wage Growth in Financial Services (2011 Q3), Job Loss and Recovery (2011 Q4)Job and Output Growth (2012 Q1)
Gains in Unemployment (2012 Q2) 
Source: http://www.brookings.edu/metro/MetroMonitor.aspx
Download Data: Data through 1st Quarter 2012
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Neighborhood Diversity

Data are from Brown University's US2010: America in the First Decade of the 20th Century, a project dedicated to changes in American society in the recent past. Estimates of racial composition today derive from the 2005-2009 tract-level American Community Survey data, which are subject to sampling error and may be imprecise in small areas.

Commentaries:

Neighborhood Diversity

Source: http://www.s4.brown.edu/us2010/About/History.htm

Download Data:

Neighborhood Exposure, Segregation

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Occupational Employment Statistics (OES)
OES derive from a semiannual mail survey measuring wage rates and occupational employment totals for wage and salary workers in non-farm establishments in the United States. The OES data use the Office of Management and Budget's Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system, which includes 801 detailed occupations comprising 23 major occupational groups. The survey sample of 1.2 million establishments over six panels is drawn from state Unemployment Insurance files. The OES provides cross-industry data files.
Commentaries: Earnings and Housing Affordability
Source: http://www.bls.gov/oes/oes_dl.htm
Download Data: 2005 - 2010
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Out of Reach (National Low Income Housing Coalition)
Out of Reach data are based on the Housing Wage, the hourly wage a worker must earn to afford a rental home at the area's Fair Market Rent (FMR). The National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC) calculates the Housing Wage by comparing wages and rents in every county, Metropolitan Area (MSAs/HMFAs), combined nonmetropolitan area and state in the U.S. This calculation is based on the widely accepted standard that housing is unaffordable if it is greater than 30% of household income.
Commentaries: The Housing Wage
Source:

http://www.nlihc.org/oor/
http://www.nlihc.org/oor/oor2011

Download Data: 2000 - 2010, 2012, 2013
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Public Library Survey (PLS)

The Public Libraries Survey (PLS) is a national census of public library systems. It is conducted annually by the Institute of Museum and Library Services in partnership with the U.S. Census Bureau, State Library Agencies, and the Library Statistics Working Group. Its data elements cover library service measures such as circulation, library visits, the number of Internet terminals available to the general public, reference transactions, children's program attendance, and circulation of children's materials. It also includes information on collection sizes, staffing, operating revenue and expenditures. The PLS is designed as a universe survey; its survey frame consists of 9,225 public libraries in the 50 states, the District of Columbia and selected US territories. It is administered via a web-based survey tool.

Commentaries: Libraries: A Port in the Storm
Source: http://www.imls.gov
Download Data: FY 2009 Public Library Survey
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Uniform Crime Reports (UCR)

The Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) are a set of standardized crime statistics updated monthly and summarized to the metropolitan, county and state levels. Over 17,000 local law-enforcement agencies report a standardized set of crime statistics to the FBI, which compiles them into a nationally accessible database.  Local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies, as well as criminologists, sociologists, legislators, the media and the general public access and analyze these data.

Data for this analysis were compiled by the National Archive for Criminal Justice Data (AC) from UCR data, and are adjusted to account for missing observations. Additionally, these data avoid the biases involved with ranking disparate metropolitan areas, since the analysis measures changes in rates, rather than levels.

Commentaries: Declining Violent Crime
Source: http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/ucr.htm
Download Data: 2000 - 2009
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Zillow Home Value Index

The Zillow Home Value Index represents the median price of a home in a given geographical area. Zillow estimates the value of tens of millions of individual homes using a proprietary formula. The data come from most county and municipal governments and are updated regularly.

Commentaries: Zillow Home Values, Zillow Q42012
Source: http://www.zillow.com/wikipages/What's-the-Zillow-Home-Value-Index/
Download Data: 2012, Zillow Q4 2012
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